Tax Calculator for the Employed and Self Employed

Employed and Self Employed uses tax information from the tax year 2014 / 2015 to show you take-home pay. See what happens when you are both employed and self employed at the same time - with UK income tax, National Insurance, student loan and pension deductions. More information about the calculations performed is available on the details page.

Employment

This is your total annual salary, before any deductions have been made.
Monthly Overtime@
@
If you do any overtime, enter the number of hours you do each month and the rate you get paid at - for example, if you did 10 extra hours each month at time-and-a-half, you would enter "10 @ 1.5". 5 hours double time would be "5 @ 2".
%If you contribute to a pension scheme, enter the percentage you contribute to the "pension" field.
If your pension is considered "contracted-out", you will pay lower National Insurance at band D. This is applied for pensions which are "defined benefit" (salary-related) - otherwise the normal band A NI is applied. Your payslip or your employer should be able to confirm whether your pension is contracted out. If you are uncertain, leave this box ticked.

Self-Employment

The total annual income from your self-employment, before expenses.
The total annual outgoings for your self-employment - enter the total of any allowable expenses in here.
National Insurance
If you have a certificate of deferment for Class 2 or Class 4 National Insurance contributions, tick the relevant box. If in doubt, leave Class 2 unticked but tick Class 4.
See the important note below about Class 4 deferment.

About You

If you know it, you can enter your tax code in here. If you don't know your tax code, simply leave this blank.
AgeWhich age group you are in affects your tax-free allowance, and whether or not you pay National Insurance. For the 2014/15 tax year, this is your age on 6th April 2014.
 Married people over the age of 75 get a tax rebate - tick this box if this applies to you.
Tick the "Blind" box if you are registered blind, as this affects your personal tax-free allowance.
If you do not pay National Insurance contributions, for instance, if you are over state pension age, tick the "No NI" box.
Student LoanThere are now two methods of repaying Student Loans. If you started your course before 1st September 2012, tick "Plan 1". If you started your course after 1st September 2012, tick "Plan2".
 
 YearlyMonthlyWeeklyDaily
Employment
Employment income 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pension deductions 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Taxable income 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Tax 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
National Insurance 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Student Loan 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Take Home 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Self-Employment
Self-Employment Profit 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Taxable income 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Tax 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Class 2 NICs 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Class 4 NICs 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Student Loan 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Take Home 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Overall totals
Total income 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Pension deductions 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Taxable income 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Tax 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
National Insurance 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Student Loan 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Take Home 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Use the options to the right to change the time periods displayed, or the tax year that should be used for calculations.

Daily results based on a 5-day week

Amount owed to HMRC: 0.00. Payment on account for 2015/16: 0.00.

Total due by 31st January 2016: 0.00.

A further payment on account due by 31st July 2016: 0.00.

This does not include any payments on account you may already have made for the 2014/15 tax year.

How does this work?

The calculator needs some information from you before working out your tax and National Insurance. Firstly, you need to enter the annual salary that you receive from your employment, and (if applicable) any overtime or pension details. Then enter your annual income and outgoings from self-employment. Your tax code, age, and other options might also affect your calculations.

If you are employed and self employed at the same time, you will find that your employer will deduct from your pay the tax, National Insurance and student loan deductions that you owe on your employment income. However, you will also have to tell HMRC about your self-employment income, so that your other deductions can be calculated. Using the details provided above, the calculator will try to work out the additional amount that HMRC will ask you to pay.

If your self-employment income is below the small earnings limit (5,885 for 2014 / 15) you can apply to HMRC to defer your Class 2 National Insurance contributions - tick this option if this applies to you. You might choose to pay these contributions anyway, to make sure that you are entitled to the benefits of National Insurance, such as the State Pension. More information available from HMRC - Class 2 National Insurance exceptions.

If you make a loss on your self employment, you may be able to get a refund of the income tax you paid through your employment (PAYE). This is only valid for self-employment which is done for a profit and would not apply to self-employment which is run as a hobby (for example). You may be issued with a refund, or have the loss applied to your profits from another tax year, or have your tax code adjusted so your PAYE tax deductions are lower. More information is available from HMRC (PDF) or a tax advisor.

Class 4 National Insurance Deferment - If you are both employed and self-employed, you can apply to HMRC for your Class 4 National Insurance contributions to be deferred. This is important as it can make a large difference to the amount of National Insurance you are asked to pay. If you have a certificate of deferment of Class 4 contributions, tick this box. Without this certificate, you should untick the box - this will show you how much more you may be asked to pay. You can learn about applying for Class 4 deferment on the HMRC website. If you pay more than you needed to, you can apply for a refund - see this information from HMRC about National Insurance refunds.

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